The Coldest Beer in Captivity
Thursday, June 22, 2006 at 08:47PM
Malcolm Lambe

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not "Sub Zero"
Over this side of the playground the Poms are getting their nickers in a twist over a new super-cold beer that has just been launched on the flat (ha ha) U.K. beer market. Called "Sub Zero" by Coors - the Canuck Brewers. It comes out of the tap half-frozen. Cool or what? Très cool.

It's designed to be drunk - or more appropriately "slurped" at Minus 2.5°C - a temp at which a layer of slushy ice crystals floats just below the foamy head. They bill it as "The beer that sticks to your tongue" - no they don't. I just made that up. Actually they tout it as "The coldest draught beer in the world".

The wallys from "The Campaign for Real Ale" have their polka-dot boxer-shorts in a twist, saying "if you serve any yellow liquid at that temperature you could probably drink it". WTF? They saying this stuff is wee-wee? They reckon Sub Zero is tasteless. Cause your pommy piss is served at 7°-8°C. They reckon beer loses its flavour at low temperatures.

Coors said the biggest challenge was to develop a dispenser that served the beer at the right temperature without bursting the pipes. But they did it and have so far installed it in 100 pubs in the U.K. The beer is stored at normal cellar temperatures of 11 to 13C before being transferred to two cooling chambers within the bar that lower its temperature to between minus 4° and minus 5°C.

And dig this! The beer is placed on a turntable that spins at 45rpm. Like an oldtime vinyl record. A jet of cold water is sprayed on the outside of the glass for 10 seconds, chilling it to 5°C. The beer then takes 20 seconds to pour. And then...two seconds before completion a small sonic pulse is fired into the stream of beer from the nozzle, prompting the formation of bubbles. These bubbles turn into "seed" crystals and attract water molecules, making larger crystals of ice that float below the head of the beer.

Bit of a performance isn't it? But no more so than pouring a Guinness or the like. The Sub Zero is served at minus 2.5°C and naturally stays colder a lot longer than normal beers. I wonder if it goes flat quicker? This would go well Downunder in places like Queensland and Darwin, wouldn't it?

Article originally appeared on flotsam & jetsam from the wordwide web (http://www.welcometowallyworld.com/).
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