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Tuesday
Feb212006

China & The Forbidden City of the Internet

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"dream-like love"
"Eleven years after young Chinese returning from graduate study in the United States persuaded the party to offer Internet access to the public, China is home to one of the largest, fastest-growing and most active populations of Internet users in the world, according to several surveys. With more than 111 million people connected to the Web, China ranks second to the United States.

Although just a fraction of all Chinese go online -- and most who do play games, download music or gossip with friends -- widespread Internet use in the nation's largest cities and among the educated is changing the way Chinese learn about the world and weakening the Communist Party's monopoly on the media."

This is fascinating. More here - the click that broke a government's grip231239-277216-thumbnail.jpg
Year of the Dog

The illustration on the top left is from Chinese Performance Artist Li Wei. See more of his work here - liweiart.com231239-277319-thumbnail.jpg
Chinese Superman

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Reader Comments (5)

I read about Li Datong's stand, glad to hear the outcome. It's a far cry from when I first connected to the Internet, and terrified Chinese using dialup email at high expense had to ask people on email lists to post them the works of various American poets in plain text - then quickly break off the contact.

A friend of mine has just spent two years living in Dalian. Prolly won't be allowed back, because he's the iconoclast to end them all, but in just that 8-year span, he had low-cost ADSL connection. (Hotmail and AOL email though can be hard to contact.)

I don't think much of Microsoft recently bowing to Chinese censorship and restrictions, or Google, but I believe Google has apologised and may be rethinking it. In any case, the first Chinese who learn about anonymous web browsing services are sure to let their friends know! (Then there are the anonymous email senders that don't need an STMP engine...)
February 21, 2006 | Unregistered CommenterLou
Pardon my ignorance, Lou...but WTF is a "STMP engine". We're not all geeks on this site, you know. :)
February 21, 2006 | Unregistered Commenterlambe, paris
Whoops! - typo! SMTP - Simple Mail Transfer Protocol - what sends your outgoing email (pop3 or eg IMAP for incoming). Some viruses and trojans come with their own, eg to send out infected emails to everyone in your email address book without you knowing.

And some, like anonymous email, don't need 'em <g>
February 21, 2006 | Unregistered CommenterLou
Arrggh, more typos - supposed to be 'poets' in the first post! (It's the Lake Breeze 2002 Cab Sauv - magniffy...)

Mal: I fixed it, juicehead.
February 21, 2006 | Unregistered CommenterLou
Yes, the advent of the internet and its proliferation in China are excellent steps forward on the road to Democracy and free speech. Personally I didn't hear about that Li dude but you have to wonder whether or not he's going to cop it in a year or so when the publicity surrounding him/her dies down. The Chinese government has an exceedingly long memory.

One of the things I find hardest to understand about the whole democracy/communism/dictatorship thing is that those of us that live in a democracy are so complacent that we never stand up and make a stink about those things that we do not agree with. We rely on our votes and the votes of our compatriots to carry the day. But increasingly, the hip pocket carries more power in a democracy rather than right/wrong. We need to all be more outspoken about those things that we don't agree with. We have just as much at stake but less at risk compared to those people in China.
February 21, 2006 | Unregistered CommenterUncle B

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